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Noovo Editions

Noovo Editions is an independent editorial project with online and paper editions. First of its kind in Spain from an unique and contemporary perspective on the international panorama,
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Interviews ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 
----------------------------------------------------........................-.INTERVIEW WITH H E D M A N K L I N G
 

© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

H E D M A N K L I N G is established by curator and exhibition designer Sofia Hedman and artistic director and designer Karolina Kling and offers a new aesthetic world of experimental and amusing exhibitions and graphics. "One of our main reason to start the H E D M A N K L I N G company, was for us to be able to create the work that noone else gave us - to be free to express our view through our graphic and conceptual language and create the project where both our talents could be seen but with help through other designers work."

"I like to see H E D M A N K L I N G this as a creative plattform where we allow ourselves to be as creative as we possible can be and create projects that collect great designers of our time in a visual and conceptual interesting environment".

`Shades Down In Tokyo Town’ is a touring exhibition exploring the provocative subject of eyewear, focusing on sunglasses. The name for the project evolved from the interplay of light and shade – the light dims when the shades go on. "An idea that just came up during one of our descussions, and we then shaped it down to the project it is today.

 
How do you meet each other and how did an idea like HEDMANKLING comes up?
We met through one of our common friends in London and became really good friends. We worked on some of Karolina’s  (Kling by Kling) exhibitions and fashion shows together and we found out that our way to think was really similar and that we worked really well together.

 Last year we decided to start H E D M A N K L I N G and Shades Down in Tokyo Town – An exhibition that features the creatures and their spectacular spectacles is the first project we have created.
 
We wanted to find a space where we could work with fashion and art but also mix the fashion academia with something very contemporary.
 
Karolina - Personally I found myself tired of the Fashion scene and curious to work in other scales and mediums with my designs and graphics. I was also driven to start something new not work on my own, so of course I wanted to work with Sofia, and it was the perfect timing to start HEDMANKLING.

Sofia - What I loved with Karolina from the first time was her humour in her illustrations and in her storytelling through her characters - and how she brings in another dimension into everything that she creates. As she is really funny it’s just so fun working together.


© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

You define your project as " the first in a series of experimental exhibitions", what does it means?
Shades Down is the first exhibition under HEDMANKLING and with this we are creating the platform for how we want to work, and it will hopefully grow bigger as we go along.
 
In Shades Down in Tokyo Town we are focusing on glasses, with our next exhibition project we are going to explore another theme, but we will work in a similar way from the same platform.
 
When working with so many amazing people in the same time, it becomes very dynamic. We want to both stretch the idea of what you can do curatorialy and what you can do with an exhibition design within a gallery or museum context.
 
We would like to explore many as many technical solutions and mediums as possible. We really like collaborations and to work together with artists and companies that inspire us, so we are really excited about the future!
 
It looks like HEDMANKLING project is in its first steps, how do you feel in terms of future?
Yes HEDMANKLING is like mentioned in its first step and Shades Down is the first exhibition in what we are planning to be many many years of exhibition shows and collaboration projects. After the overwhelmingly good reaction after the opening, we feel very excited to see where we go from here.
 
We really see this as an amazing platform that we have created, where we allow ourselves to work with everything that interest us and collaborate with people that are an inspiration to us.


© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

"Shades Down in Tokyo"  is focusing on sunglasses, could you explain why did you choose this subject?
It was our friend curator Gemma A. Williams, who also is the editor of the exhibition catalogue and co-curator of our exhibition, who found out that it was an unexhibtited archive of Oliver Goldsmith glasses at the Victoria & Albert museum. She started to work on a more historical exploration of sunglasses and glasses and our exhibition kind of satellite exhibition to that. This exhibition came in the same time as sunglasses started to get really strong as a fashion accessory and more and more designers started to add it into their collections.
For us the purpose of this exhibition is to illustrate how sunglasses can be transformed into an artifact by inviting experimental artists and designers to expand on this traditional concept and create their own sunglasses. The exhibitors are all a huge inspiration for us in their remarkable artistic, conceptual, experimental skills and their way to work.
When thinking of how important sunglasses and spectres are have been in the history within film, music and fashion, it is strange that big institutions have not explored the subject more when there has been so many amazing and experimental creations throughout the history. 
 
Our inspiration was Oliver Goldsmith eccentric and ground-breaking designs from the 1960 and 1980s that reconstructed our  ideas of what sunglasses can be– like his TVs, music notes, triangles and battery-driven miniature windscreen- wipers to name only a few.
 
We have tried to surround the subject from as many angels as possible as the subject has so many layers. The catalogue, that is edited by Gemma A. Williams, opens up a dialogue on the importance of sunglasses in culture, hoping to offer a fuller understanding of the interdisciplinary implications of these objects in culture.  Texts from a wide range of curators, writers and academics offer new interpretations of sunglasses, essentially attempting to unravel their essence.  Gus Wylie discusses the importance of sunglasses in film, while Dr. Will Brooker focuses on the power of sunglasses in creating a performing identity; curator Beatrice Behlen traces the use of sunglasses in the British Royal Family and Mary Caton critiques the scientific developments in this genre; Marco Pecorari hypotheses on the concept of a ‘tool of knowledge’ and Patricia Frost looks at sunglasses and their collectors; Diane Pernet explores the role sunglasses play in personal identity and the artist Robert Rubbish reveals his personal interplay with sunglasses in his art; fashion historian Caroline Cox contextualises sunglasses in the 1970s while curator Sonnet Stanfill outlines the role of the Oliver Goldsmith archive in the revised Victoria & Albert museum website.  Neil Handley, curator of the British Optical Association museum traces recent historical developments in eyewear and the catalogue also contains a conversation with Claire Goldsmith, granddaughter of the original Oliver Goldsmith. 

© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

What do you most dislike about our current culture? And about contemporary fashion scene?
 
We do not really like looking down on the culture or focus on negative things. To be honest we are so inside of our bubble that we are only focusing on all the inspiring things around us here in London and in the places we are experiencing. 
 
Sofia – As any other art forms, fashion includes a spectra from commercial to less commercial culture. We are working inside of the part of the fashion system that has maybe more in common within the art world than the rest of the fashion world in the way these artists and designers function, create and exist. What we are doing is trying to create a platform for this more non-commercial part within a gallery context.
 
Karolina -  when I lived in Gothenburg (where I am from) I was constantly complaining about that nothing was happening and that there wasn´t a scene and so on. In London there will never NOT be a scene. The scene that is depending on the overall culture is constantly changing and it is in its own movement inspiring to us.
 
When it comes to contemporary fashion; There is always one subject people here in London choosing to pick up and focusing on. Sometimes its fashion, sometimes art, other times its just floating to find what next thing is going to be THE thing. Fashion is def not the one in focus right now, and I personally think it’s a good thing. Its need to recover, think over where its going and then, in maybe two years or so its coming back but hopefully with a stronger movement, something that speaks through the clothes, a message, a movement. For me fashion is the least inspiring of all art forms at the moment, and I rarely find myself seeking for inspiration in that field, I rather look at art, graphics, conceptual designers etc, anything that’s fun, interesting, genuine, beautiful. NOT saying that there aren´t interesting fashion around, but as  scene? No. The only thing I DO find inspiring in the fashion scene at the moment is the men’s fashion.
 
I was thinking about as "Fashion Folk" the other day. It’s like bringing the feeling of the country into the city. This is really focusing on the materials, the tailoring, where it’s from - the fashion translation of organic food if you like. Small boutiques with a unique selection, pricy though so not for everyone, it’s for all those already done the scene, now starting to get the payroll, house and kids. So, not the most revolutionary, but still for me inspiring and a natural reflection on society. People want pieces in their wardrobe that are going to last. That are made in good materials and have a story behind. And that is where I really think it all is going. Back to the countryside in the city. 
 
 
Could you give us, in advanced, something from your next exhibition?
As mentioned "Shades Down" are going to tour, and for each place new thing are going to be explored and things are going to change a lot. If you are in Sweden, London or Melbourne – keep your eyes open!



© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

HEDMANKLING is a great creative platform but, to clarify, what is your main focus?
Through HEDMANKLING we want to create a space where we can work curatorialy and aesthetically with the people that we like most. Our wish is also to collaborate with people who can find really high technical solutions for us. We want to offer an aesthetic world of experimental and amusing exhibitions and exhibition designs that surprise and hopefully inspire the audience. We want to bring our exhibitions out to a big audience.
 
Our main focus is to do exhibitions for the gallery and the museum context. But we also work with separate installations, window displays, products and other art and fashion related projects.
 
We would like to work with long time relationships and collaborations as we think it is very interesting for the final outcome.
 
Karolina - I have my past in design of fashion, illustrations, products and installations so for me is a big focus the exhibition design, the concept behind the exhibition and the graphics. In 2006 I started my own label KLIGN by KLING, under which I been producing fashion collections, products and installations. With the collection “The land of Dreams” AW08 I created something I chosen to call "the Kling concept"; creating characters, give them a stories and then reflect this story through my prints. This concept is today reflected in all my work covering installations, prints, graphic material and fashion pieces.
I have also exhibit my work in London, Paris, Stockholm, New York, Copenhagen, Tokyo, L.A and Las Vegas, showing my collections,  colaboration work, solo fashion shows and installations. I also produce prints, graphics and installations for various of clients such as Wieden+Kenedy,  Donna Karen, VOLVO,  TOP SHOP, Monki, Falcon beer, Libero, H&M, Reebok, Weekday, Cheapo, Nudie and T-shirt store.  
 
Sofia - I am academic and Karolina is directly from the design world. We wanted to find a space where we could work with fashion and art but also mix the academia with something very contemporary. We want the exhibitions to include a multiple of layers – that they can be read from many different perspectives. We want to create an exhibition that creates an instant visually and bodily impact, but in the same time just as much on pedestals really highlight the individual artist’s and designer’s amazing work. We also like to explore the objects within the wider academic and historical context. I am both highly inspired by curator and exhibition designer Judith Clark in her way to visually translate the curatorial narrative into the exhibition design and by curator Amy de la Haye’s amazing object based curation.


© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

Why did you choose "Shades Down in Tokyo Town" as a title of your first exhibition?
The whole name of the exhibition is Shade Down In Tokyo Town – An exhibition that features the creatures and their spectacular spectacles. We were twisting the words around trying to come up with something that sounded good. Playing on shades obviously to trying to include the sunglasses theme somehow. So, when we came up with the name it was just Klinging really nice and we stuck to that. When it will tour the name will be ‘Shades Down in London Town ‘ and so on..
The second part of the exhibition name, An exhibition that features the creatures and their spectacular spectacles, reflect the idea behind the exhibition. The curatorial inspiration is Karolina’s own use of characters in her creations. When starting a new collection or installation, Karolina always start with working from made up hypothetical characters and give them stories, this to embrace the storytelling and to offer an added dimension into the work.  When we invited the participants, we asked them to first create a character and then to do the shades or glasses to their character.
 
At the moment the exhibition "Shades Down in Tokyo Town" is being held at Calm & Punk gallery in Tokyo but, is it going to exhibit elsewhere?
Yes it is touring around, and Tokyo was the opening/beginning of the exhibition. Then it is going to be exhibited in London, Gothenburg and probably also Sidney as we just got asked to put it up over there which is really exiting. All dates will be announced on our website. 
 
We are extremely excited to have it touring and it is really interesting to work on a project that is constantly evolving. New artists, designers and contributors will be invited, the exhibition designs again explored but we are also hoping to in the end bring it in a wider historical context.


© phography by Tomohiro Horiuchi

You were working with big names as; Ann-Sofie Back, BCXSY, Bernhard Willhelm, BLESS, Charlie Le Mindu, Helle Mardahl, Henrik Vibskov, Iris   Schieferstein, Josefin Arnell, Kling by Kling, Maiko Takeda, ManfreDu Schu, Mykita, Piers Atkinson, SWD/Skyward and Walter Van Beirendonck, how this people react to a project like yours?
 Everyone has been fantastic. Some of them are our friends, others we have been working with before for earlier exhibitions and some are new.
 
Talk us a little bit about your work process.....How was your selection process?
We started with selecting artists and designers around Europe, US and Japan that we felt inspiring to us in the way they worked, their aesthetics, expression, craft and the mediums they use.
 
These artists and designers function, create and exist in ways which work outside the more commercial part of the fashion system. The selected designer participants can be seen as what Luca Marchetti and Emanuele Quinz in the exhibition Dysfashional (MUDAM, 2007) calls ‘dysfunctional in their own fashion system.’ Our chosen participants explore the space around the body – similar to what experimental fashion designer Hussein Chalayan refers to as ‘microgeography,’ They leap into the unconscious, slicing through the constructs of beauty and humour, creating hypothetic worlds of the very purest and concentrated form of ideas in a totally timeless way.
 
Shades Down in Tokyo Town is essentially the silhouette of a town. Karolina’s graphics visually translate the curatorial narrative. Abstract outlines and shapes - inspired by historically important frames- abound as the historical is rooted firmly in the present through the stark bold outlines. Eyes, shades and oversized characters appear to float about the space, focusing attention on the creatures and their spectacles. The exhibition design reveals a highly visible curatorial voice.

What does glasses design means to you?
Karolina - For me this project is having its strength in investigating and open the mind what is possible to do with glasses. As a shape, as an art form and not necessarily a fashion icon. I mean, of course it’s a fashion icon and always going to be so, but for me it is interesting to see what can happen when designers and artists create something without having the sale aspect connected to the creation, but just the freedom to think open minded and have fun. So, it’s not just glasses as an object that means a lot to me, more the way that we chosen work with it in this particular exhibition / project. 
 
Sofia – I adore how sunglasses and glasses can explore and adorn the space around the face and that it is such an interdisciplinary subject. When you get deeper into exploring the history, it is really fascinating. We got very inspired by a lot of old 19th century drawings of optical instruments and examinations. The British Optical Association Museum has an amazing collection of eye and spectres related objects.
 
What do you expect from an exhibition like "Shades Down in Tokyo"?
We are not much for building up expectations. We have been super focused on getting this done exactly as we want it, as good as we possibly can and worked super hard on getting all the pieces together and selecting what we think is representing a fantastic selection of artists / designs and their work.
 
It is really wonderful how we have met so many people that we work so well with. For this exhibition we have worked really closely with graphic designer Serge Martynov fashion curator Gemma A. Williams and photographer Gavin Fernandes who are all so brilliant and that we wish to work with in further projects as well. Also the Calm & Punk gallery in Tokyo has been absolutely amazing and we have already started to discuss new projects that we want to do together in the future.












More Info: http://www.hedmankling.com
Press: press@hedmankling.com

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